Archive for the cartoon music Category

Soothing Sounds for Baby 1

Posted in cartoon music, closet favorite, distressed, ineffably poignant on June 29, 2011 by jonathanghess

What relaxes you?  Making a drink and taking off your shoes. Reading a newspaper from somewhere else. Music. Music! Everything is Music.

These things relax me. Wear headphones, lie down. Listen.


Cat biting nails

Some people either love this or hate it. Me- have a cat on my chest relaxed enough to see me as an inanimate object, a heated bed, and start taking a bath or if I’m lucky,  biting his nails- that’s heaven to me. Neither of us is going to move.

The nails, the purring, nursing kitten, the other sleepy cat, the light… this was someone’s peak experience.

 

 

ROM Pack

Something about this guy’s accent and brain dead delivery (“It”), the close-miked, compressed production, the music, and- well, I’m not sure what all else- lull me into a deaf, milky late-night stupor. Lights out. Next!

 


 

Sunday Night

Somehow, Beatrice Witkin, an electronic/ new music composer, got these two tunes to be used for the opening and closing credits of the early 70s nature show “Wild Wild World of Animals”. 

They didn’t sound like the other music you’d hear on tv.

The instrumentals have an ineffable quality that, judging by the passionate, protracted comments on Youtube, haunted a lot of children, myself included.

These trigger feelings of Sunday night, sitting between my parent’s legs getting them to play with my hair, watching grainy footage of cheetahs stalking in the savanna… getting drowsy… eyes closing….

‘Night, people.

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Jacques Loussier- You Only Love Once

Posted in cartoon music, whole weird world on July 23, 2010 by jonathanghess

French pianist and composer Jacques Loussier is best known for his jazz trio interpretations of classical pieces. Those spartan, tasteful arrangements are a far cry from the wild sounds on this soundtrack LP! On these dense, eccentrically orchestrated tunes, Loussier manages to balance richly melodic themes with dissonant noise, find toe-tapping grooves in non-2/4 time signatures, and generally remain unpredictable without sacrificing pleasurable accessibility.

Another swell find that came through the store that I never would have found otherwise- the film is pretty obscure. I selected five of the most rocked-out numbers, but the whole record is great, and available on iTunes if you want to own the whole thing…

ballet photo rouge mp3

ballade dans paris la nuit mp3

poursuite jaguar mp3

clara’s jerk mp3

leslie’s jerk mp3

Apologies again for the blurry photo.

Henri Salvador- Hello Mickey!

Posted in cartoon music, drum machine, home recording, ineffably poignant, my favorite song on June 24, 2010 by jonathanghess

I won’t go into a big introduction for Henri Salvador; if you aren’t familiar with him already and you want to know more, click here. Needless to say, as you can see by the cover image above, he exudes fun-loving charm.

Until this beat-up LP arrived in the store, I hadn’t heard of him. The major joy of working in a record store was having the opportunity to explore just such relics (because there’s few better words to describe a physical artifact like this), and discovering magic!

Hello Mickey! mp3

The crazed sound of this tune is a result of enormous talent, personality, and the fact that Henri played all the instruments and produced the recording himself, at home. Not many musicians were doing this in 1970! When one player calls all the shots, the sound is pure personal expression- and very, very few one-man bands that I’ve heard express such positivity mixed with a unique, ineffable poignancy as Henri Salvador. Why would a song about Mickey Mouse’s Birthday slip into a minor chord b-part? Only a Gallic genius of the highest magnitude would know, and he’s passed on…. The whole record is great- I’ll transfer more of the LP later and post more here.

This particular LP sleeve is pretty special, too. It belonged to the French American International School of San Francisco, which at the time was located around the corner from the shop (this is a prime example of availability directly corresponding to regionalism, something record buyers come to anticipate). The LP bears the marks of innumerable childrens hands, and it’s pleasing to imagine how many little listeners have been exposed to the sounds on this record over the decades.

Something about the layout and artwork on the back cover just slays me- some quality of melancholy, like a broken toy (ah, the Frenchness of it all!).

Click to really see…